Fintech Flutterwave has accounts frozen in Kenya amid court probe | Technology News

Roben Walker

A Kenyan court froze more than $40m in accounts belonging to fintech firm Flutterwave under the country’s anti-money laundering laws.

A court in Kenya has frozen more than $40m in accounts belonging to Africa-focused fintech payments giant Flutterwave under the country’s anti-money laundering laws, court documents showed.

Founded in 2016 in Nigeria, the San Francisco-headquartered firm, specialises in individual and consumer financial transfers, one of several fintech firms facilitating and capitalising on Africa’s booming payments market.

Earlier this year, the firm raised $250m, valuing the startup company at more than $3bn.

Kenya’s Assets Recovery Agency sought and was granted a High Court order to freeze several accounts with three banks belonging to Kenyan-registered Flutterwave Payment Technology Ltd.

Flutterwave confirmed to the Reuters news agency that it owned the company. It said in a separate statement that claims of financial impropriety in Kenya were “entirely false”.

The court order, which is dated July 1, stops Flutterwave from conducting any transactions from more than a dozen accounts with three banks, which held $43m in dollars, sterling, euro and Kenyan shillings.

“These orders shall subsist for a period of 90 days as provided in section 84 of Proceeds of Crime and Anti-Money Laundering Act,” Judge Esther Maina said in a ruling pending a full hearing and final order at a later date.

Flutterwave said its operations were regularly audited and it continuously engaged regulatory agencies to stay compliant.

 

https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2022/7/7/flutterwave-accounts-frozen-in-kenya-over-money-laundering-claims

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